Walmart shooter bought pistol on the day of the attack and left behind a ‘death note’

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A police tape is seen at the site of a fatal shooting in a Walmart on November 23, 2022 in Chesapeake, Virginia.
Nathan Howard | Getty Images

The Walmart night crew supervisor who shot and killed six his co-workers Tuesday used a handgun he purchased the morning of the attack and left a “death note,” according to details released Friday by Chesapeake, Virginia, officials.

The new details indicate 31-year-old Andre Bing used a 9-millimeter pistol which he legally purchased from a local store the same day as the shooting.

Officers said they found ammunition, a receipt and paperwork related to the gun purchase at Bing’s residence.

Police responded to the shooting shortly after 10 p.m. ET on Tuesday, minutes after the attack was reported, and mere days before Thanksgiving and the kickoff of the holiday shopping season. A 16-year-old boy was among the victims, officials said. The victims were honored in a vigil Thursday night.

Bing, who officials said had no criminal history, died at the scene from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The note recovered on Bing’s cellphone revealed complaints the mass shooter had about his co-workers and provided a glimpse into his potential motive for the deadly shooting.

In the note, which included references to God and the Holy Spirit, Bing described alleged harassment by his co-workers. His former colleagues, according to The New York Times, had described him as “weird” and said he would sometimes demonstrate a “nasty attitude.”

“There is nothing that can justify taking innocent lives,” Walmart said in a statement. “Our focus continues to be on the families who are grieving and supporting our associates through this difficult time.”

Officials added that two victims are being treated in area hospitals. One remains in critical condition, while the other was improving.

If you are having suicidal thoughts or are in distress, contact the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 for support and assistance from a trained counselor.

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